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FYS Language, Culture, and the World of Esperanto

Scholarly vs. Popular vs. Trade Publications

How can you tell the difference between SCHOLARLY JOURNAL ARTICLES, POPULAR NEWSPAPER AND MAGAZINE ARTICLES, and TRADE PUBLICATION MAGAZINES? Here is a table with some key differences.

 

SCHOLARLY

Image result for journal of education

POPULAR

Image result for time magazine

TRADE

Image result for OT practice magazine

CONTENT
  • Academic research
  • Academic reviews
  • Language is formal and can include field jargon
  • Articles are usually lengthy
  • Popular culture Info
  • Current events/ news
  • Language is usually more informal
  • Articles tend to be shorter
  • Industry/field news
  • Professional interest articles
  • Language is heavy on professional jargon though usually not as formal as a scholarly article
INTENDED AUDIENCE
  • Scholars
  • Researchers
  • Undergraduate/Graduate Students
  •  General public
  • Industry/Field Professionals 
REFERENCES/CITED SOURCES
  • Always listed and usually extensive
  • Scientific journals include original research info/data
  • Never (though sources are often quoted within the text)
  • Sometimes listed but not extensive research cited
AUTHOR/S
  • Scholars/Researchers  
  • Usually journalists
  • Sometimes scholars or professionals
  • Usually working professionals (teachers, therapists, etc.) 
  • Sometimes scholars within the field
REVIEW POLICY
  • "Peer-reviewed" by an editorial board of scholars in particular field
  • Editorial staff, usually made up of journalists
  • Editorial staff, usually made up of professionals
PICTURES/ADS
  • Most visuals are graphs or charts with data
  • Some will have a small picture or two but typically have none
  • Usually no or few ads
  • Frequently contain glossy ads 
  • Contain large and numerous pictures to accompany articles
  • Frequently contain advertisements and some pictures to accompany articles (though not as many as in a popular magazine or newspaper)
EXAMPLES
  • The American Journal of Psychology
  • The Journal of Asian Studies
  • Journal of Academic Librarianship
  • Occupational Therapy in Mental Health
  • Time
  • Rolling Stone
  • Scientific American
  • Consumer Reports
  • OT Practice Magazine
  • College and Research Libraries News
  • NEA (National Education Association) Today Magazine

 

Searching the Internet

Care must be taken in searching for information on the Internet. Unlike both the print resources found in the library and the electronic databases provided by the library, freely available Internet resources have not necessarily been published by reputable academic publishers nor have they been selected by librarians with expertise in their subject area. Nearly anything can be posted on a website, and just because it is available online does not mean it is valid or authoritative.

However, this does not mean that you cannot find good resources on the Internet; the key to doing so is to carefully evaluate what you find on the web. If you use web resources, be sure to ask these questions:

  • Who is the author of the Web site? Are the author's credentials listed?
  • What institution or organization is behind the Web site?
  • When was the Web site created or last updated?
  • Who is the intended audience for the Web site?
  • Is the information provided objective or biased?
  • How does information provided by the site compare to other works, including print works?